Tomorrow’s show is ready! You’ve got Buddy Whittington, Half Deaf Clatch, Jackie Greene, Paul Lamb and the Kingsnakes, Walter Trout, Mud Morganfield, Magic Slim, Otis Grand, The Untouchables, Grana Louise and mach much more! Tune in from 9pm UK time tomorrow onwww.europejazzradio.eu

Tomorrow’s show is ready! You’ve got Buddy Whittington, Half Deaf Clatch, Jackie Greene, Paul Lamb and the Kingsnakes, Walter Trout, Mud Morganfield, Magic Slim, Otis Grand, The Untouchables, Grana Louise and mach much more! Tune in from 9pm UK time tomorrow onwww.europejazzradio.eu


mucksblues:

Mississippi Fred McDowell ~ Blues Maker 


Thorbjørn Risager - Too Many Roads

I have been told by some big names in the blues that Scandinavia is the place to go for the real thing. The part of the world where the good stuff is played with the right intention and feel by all the local bands, and the music matters more than the style or fame. On the evidence of the new album from Thorbjørn RIsager, Too Many Roads, I’m inclined to believe them.

Now, saying that the blues is played properly in that area implies that it’s all old school and decidedly traditional, rooted and tied to the old ways of doing things, but that really isn’t the case. If it was then we’d all be listening to blues exclusively played on acoustic instruments by itinerant musicians, and really the blues, even in it’s traditional forms, has been subject to the forces of evolution. There has always been a thread that ties together the real stuff, and intangible bond that honours the old without slavishly copying it. That’s what this album has, a bond with the past combined with an uncanny talent for finding just the right amount of modernisation to keep it relevant.

Thorbjørn’s voice is the first of the instrument that strikes you. it’s deep and rich, dripping with emotion  and with a delivery that owes more to Tom Waits than BB King it’s employed in a direct and emotive fashion. He’s backed by a band that, as you may expect, combine tightness with a real sense of what the blues is, displaying lots of the lopsided pendulum swing that makes out a great blues rhythm section and some virtuosic performances that match their leaders ability for direct emotional connection. It’s a big sounding band, with horns, keys and guitars all to the fore, but all deftly not treading on each other’s toes and therefore forming a textural landscape that rewards repeated listens.

The modernity comes in the textures, buried in there are touches of synth bass, and a crossing of genres in the guitars that combine the delta and Chicago into something new and unexplored to the best of my knowledge. The upshot is an eerie familiarity, but an utter freshness. It seems right. It’s like you were always expecting this to happen and now it has you’re left confused by the fact it hasn’t before. It’s a natty trick, and no-one ids going to find themselves offended by this, or feeling bored by the derivativeness of the music on off.

This is an easy album to recommend, if people can keep modernising the blues in a way that doesn’t throw away the traditions, or end up with heavy rock getting the wrong label then the future is assured. I just wish more people were as able to do it as well Mr Risager.


Feel so good, J.B. Hutto #blues http://t.co/o4IBEZZQPv

gabyarretti:


rock-and-roll-will-never—die:

Fleetwood Mac - Oh Well

(1969 UK TV Performance)


harpdogblind:

T-Bone Walker - Call It Stormy Monday


giant-blues-records:

I am the Blues, 1970. Columbia

Willie Dixon (b1915 d1992)

The composer.


Robert Cray - In My Soul

Robert Cray has produced the finest album of his long career. Unlike many acts who peak early on, it’s his latest release, In My Soul, that, for me, gains the title. This isn’t hyperbole, marketing payoff or any of the things that making a statement like this will get accused of being. I’m genuine here, Robert Cray has hit his peak.

I hear a lot of music, for a large part my life revolves around it. I play it, I write about it, I broadcast it and I spend a huge chunk of my leisure time listening to it for pleasure. However it isn’t all that common that something stops me dead in my tracks, but that’s what In My Soul did. I was walking across the Jubilee Bridge in London, listening to the album on my iPod, for the first time in it’s entirety, and I just had to stop, take a deep breath and let the music do it’s thing, because if I didn’t it would be a case of blundering into tourists and causing havoc. There was no way my brain could process the emotion and handle walking in a crowd.

Taken at face value some people have described it as a lightweight record, focussed more on Roberts soulful pipes than his stinging guitar. They’re right it does focus on the song more than the virtuosity, but that’s what makes it so special. It isn’t lightweight at all, it’s as if some of us have become immune to anything other than bombast and theatre from our blues acts, and this is the antidote to that. No frippery, no flash, not ostentatious, just genuine. 

Robert is on fine form and when he does take a solo, they cut just like they used to when he started out. He’s not sounding tired or trotting out cliches, just digging deep and only employing the guitar where and when it’s needed. His voice too is better than good, it’s matured and mellowed, and now has more gravitas, meaning that the genuine subjects on which the songs muse are delivered with an authority unlike any of his contemporaries. It’s truly, deeply moving to listen to this record.

Some have called it the perfect music for summer sun and picnics, but it’s so much more than that. You can consume it without paying attention and let the beautiful production and warm sound wash over you or you can listen and devour one of the finest records ever made. It’s anything but typical Cray, it’s everything Cray has to offer, all at once.


thejazzblues:

JOHN LEE HOOKER - BAD LIKE JESSE JAMES


jimmy-conway:

Elmore James
#Blues #Music  #Vinilo

jimmy-conway:

Elmore James

#Blues
#Music
#Vinilo


(via derkreisel)


Squat That Rabbit
Taj Mahal
Like Never Before

kdo:

Taj Mahal - Squat that Rabbit (1991)
Taj Mahal / Joe Nicolo
from ”Like Never Before”

~A Pre-Easter / Bunny Related Song~


John the Revelator
Son House
Father of Folk Blues

20six20:

Christ came on Easter morning.


thefatmattress:

Currently spinning..
A rare, never mentioned classic team up. Most fans and critics brush this album aside, but I love it. It’s albums like this that I love finding out about and then actually finding.

I guess the turntable is back!

thefatmattress:

Currently spinning..

A rare, never mentioned classic team up. Most fans and critics brush this album aside, but I love it. It’s albums like this that I love finding out about and then actually finding.

I guess the turntable is back!