afimdobrasil:

Hit the Road Jack

A lenda!

Afimdobrasil


fenderlust:

"Me and a man workin’ side by side, This is what it meant They was payin’ him a dollar an hour, And they was payin’ me fifty cent They said, “If you was white, you’d be alright, If you was brown, stick around, But as you’s black, oh, brother, get back, get back, get back.” - Big Bill Broonzy

fenderlust:

"Me and a man workin’ side by side,
This is what it meant
They was payin’ him a dollar an hour,
And they was payin’ me fifty cent
They said, “If you was white, you’d be alright,
If you was brown, stick around,
But as you’s black, oh, brother, get back, get back, get back.”
- Big Bill Broonzy



Blues is the Truth 242

Blues is the Truth this week has a smattering of both the old and the new with tracks from Half Deaf Clatch lining up with Otis Rush, BB King with Robbie Hill, Chad Strentz with Lightnin’ Hopkins, Buddy Whittington and Will Johns, Otis Grand and Dale Storr. It’s packed so don’t miss it, from 9pm on www.jazzandbossaradio.com tomorrow!


Too Tired
Johnny 'Guitar' Watson
Too Tired / Don´t Touch Me

kdo:

Johnny ‘Guitar’ Watson - Too Tired (1955)
Johnny ‘Guitar’ Watson / Davis / Ling
from: “Too Tired” / ”Don´t Touch Me’



redjeep:

Eyesight To The Blind ~ Mike Zito

enjoy… ~redjeep  

Goo Dawgs! Sic Em! Woof!, Woof!, Woof!


arqvac:

"Next door neighbor" by Gary Clark Jr.


mrhume:

August 22nd 2014 - Day 235

Charlie Musselwhite - Just A Feelin’

This is a Little Walter song, immortalised by another amazing blues harp player, Charlie Musselwhite - a great song and a great cover.

Since 1967 Charlie has been consistently producing and performing blues music, and is just one of those players that seem to pop up everywhere. He is a beautiful emotionalist on the harp, and has become almost like the Eric Clapton of the harmonica world.

Sit back, put your feet up, and enjoy his gentle tones.

Namaste.


Automobile Blues
Lightnin' Hopkins
Lightnin': The Blues of Lightnin' Hopkins

kdo:

Lightnin’ Hopkins - Automobile Blues (1960)
Lightnin’ Hopkins
from: ”Lightnin’:The Blues of Lightnin’ Hopkins

Personnel:
Lightnin’ Hopkins: Vocals / Guitar
Leonard Gaskin: Bass
Belton Evans: Drums


marinatorheavytronsuperstar:

Acabo de escuchar la canción por la radio y tenía que compartirla.


classicrocknblues:

Eric Clapton, Ronnie Wood and Freddie King

classicrocknblues:

Eric Clapton, Ronnie Wood and Freddie King


suntfelix:

It could be a spoonful of diamonds,
Could be a spoonful of gold,
Just a little spoon of your precious love,
Satisfy my soul.

Men lied about a little,
Some of them cried about little,
Some of them died about a little spoon,
Everything fightin’ about a spoonful,
That spoon, that spoon, that

It could be a spoonful of coffee,
Could be a spoonful of tea,
But a little spoon of your precious love,
Good enough for me.

Men lied about that,
Some of them died about that,
Some of them cried about that,
Everybody fightin’ about a spoonful,
That spoon, that spoon, that

It could be a spoonful of water,
Save you from the desert sand,
But one spoon of lead from my forty-five,
Save you from another man.

Men lied about that,
Some of them cried about that,
Some of them died about that,
Everybody fightin’ about a spoonful,
That spoon, that spoon, that..

"Spoonful" - Howlin’ Wolf
Songwriter: Willie Dixon

❤♥ ♥❤♥ ♥❤♥ ♥❤♥ ♥❤♥ ♥❤


Show 241

Tomorrow night’s show is packed to the rafters with awesome! With me being lucky enough to go out on the day after the 2014 British Blues Awards are announced, I’m going to be one of the first places where you can hear who won. I’m going to be playing tracks from all of the award winners, along with new tunes from Ronnie Earl, Devon Allman, The Ruf Records 20th Anniversary CD, Long John Baldry and Phil Bee. It’s packed and it’s on from 9pm on www.jazzandbossaradio.com


Layla
Derek and the Dominos
Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs

We met secretly at a flat in South Kensington. Eric Clapton had asked me to come because he wanted me to listen to a new number he had written.

He switched on the tape machine, turned up the volume and played me the most powerful, moving song I had ever heard. It was Layla, about a man who falls hopelessly in love with a woman who loves him but is unavailable.

He played it to me two or three times, all the while watching my face intently for my reaction. My first thought was: ‘Oh God, everyone’s going to know this is about me.

Pattie Boyd on hearing “Layla” for the first time

(via goodmorningblues)