Otis Grand Special

I haven’t forgotten this weeks show folks. It’s a special, co presented by Otis Grand, with all the music bar the theme tune chosen by him. You might remember one of his songs being chosen by you lot to go forward in the British Blues Awards KT category last year. This is your chance to see exactly what music inspires a virtual legend. You might be surprised to hear some western swing and some slack key Hawaiian guitar along with BB King and Albert Collins. The show is packed with classic jump, blues and swing and goes out tomorrow on www.ukjazzradio.com from 9pm UK time.


Albert Lee Interview

Just after my show tonight you can catch something rather good. My Show! A whole 3 hours of me in a row, but in the second one from 11 til midnight I’ll be joined by musical legend Albert Lee as we chat through his brilliant musical career, his influences and his guitars. Well worth checking out! from 11pm on www.ukjazzradio.com


piratetreasure:

juniors juke joint

piratetreasure:

juniors juke joint



The Blind Dead McJones Band - Last Resort Mexico

The Blind Dead McJones band have a sense of humor. It’s important to understand this when you dive into their music. It’s a surreal and slightly deranged sense of humor, but it informs all that the band do, musically, lyrically and even the liner notes. The whole enterprise is wrapped up in the mythical story of an absentee band leader, Mr McJones himself, who rarely, if ever turns up for a gig, and sends instructions from wherever he’s currently holed up. It could be said that this is somewhat of a concept album, but the majority of those are wrapped up in a fog of self importance, something that this record lacks.

It opens up in fine old style, with a swagger that continues throughout the piece. The opener also sets the mood for the eclectic and original arrangements that make up the albums musical personality, with a jungle drum rhythm and dark distorted guitar working well with gritty vocals and a thumping middy bass tone. Things could definitely be called original, like a raw Tom Waits crossbred with George Thoghrogood in a Cream-like power trio, the sound is definitely atypical of the current crop of British blues bands and the songs are as individual as the music. It’s all achieved without the appearance of trying too hard too, the record’s raw, live feel suits the material, giving it all an edge of chaos while enhancing the tight dynamic feel of a band that work well together live.

This isn’t going to be a record that does much for the real blues purists out there, sharing, as it does, more with Cream or Jimi Hendrix than with Muddy or the Wolf, though the influence of the early masters is definitely present, just as it was in the music of the 60’s innovators. From the first songs lyrical exhortations that the legendary Mr McJones is bigger, better, stronger, more than anyone’s parallels with Who Do You Love to deals with the devil over a used up soul, this is a band that know where they come from musically. They also understand that they are in the now, and aren’t stuck in a past, imagined, Shangri-La. After all, it’s not many a blues band that will name check MC Hammer in a song.

It’s not a perfect record, but it is very good, stunning high points like Elephant on a Lead easily outweigh the production that can favor the bass a little too much or the occasional moments where the vocals could do with more polish. It’s a good thing to hear a British band trying something out of the ordinary, especially on a debut, and the passion and fire with which it is delivered are incendiary. I’d recommend that anyone looking for a little something outside of by the book blues rock but still not utterly traditional blues gets their hands on a copy. I’m certain that Blind Dead McJones would agree with me too, wherever he is.


welcometoiansworld:

John Lee Hooker

welcometoiansworld:

John Lee Hooker


afro-art-chick:


American blues guitarist B.B. King plays his guitar, Lucille, and sings the blues at the Sunshine Club. (c. 1971)


Credit: © Bob Adelman/Corbis

afro-art-chick:

American blues guitarist B.B. King plays his guitar, Lucille, and sings the blues at the Sunshine Club. (c. 1971)
Credit: © Bob Adelman/Corbis

Big Mama Thornton. She is just wow.

Big Mama Thornton. She is just wow.



avomikayx3:

KING

avomikayx3:

KING


rootsnbluesfestival:

Robert Cray sent this to me—-Here’s an old one.     1978- Los Angeles.Recording “Who’s Been Talking” at Sage & Sound Studio.
See Robert perform next weekend at the Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival  www.rootsnbluesnbbq.com

rootsnbluesfestival:

Robert Cray sent this to me—-
Here’s an old one.
1978- Los Angeles.
Recording “Who’s Been Talking” at Sage & Sound Studio.

See Robert perform next weekend at the Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival  www.rootsnbluesnbbq.com



Gary Moore.

Gary Moore, the guitarist from Thin Lizzy and blues legend from his solo career has passed away on holiday in Spain. His powerful hard rock influenced guitar style introduced a new legion of fans to the blues music he loved and drew them to legends such as Peter Green, Albert King and Albert Collins, and spawned legions of imitators in bars accross the world.

From Parisian Walkways to Still Got the Blues and beyond, he produced a catalog of powerful music that will stand as his memorial.

RIP Mr Moore.